Screening
Film Program 12
Sun 1 Apr 2018, 18:00
PART OF Courtisane Festival 2018
Film
  • In the presence of Mieriën Coppens
FILM
Tap
,
,
3’

A slow–dripping tap disturbs the reflection of clouds seen through the window.

FILM
Carry On
,
,
12’

Individuals wait, silence is heard, a microscopic attention through a tired mass. If the film is almost mute, it is because it focuses on silent figures, although their struggle is deafening.

FILM
Vier muren
,
,
22’

“With the camera, I can only show a house hunter’s outside, but what matters is his inside, how life inside him is decaying like a pile of rotten lettuce.”

Johan van der Keuken

 

“In mijn geval is de politieke inhoud uit het materiaal naar voren gekomen. Maar ik geloof wel dat ik van meet af aan het gevoel heb gehad voor de strijd om het bestaan, voor de energiebesteding die nodig is om in beweging te blijven. Er is geen keus: je moet in beweging blijven. In Big Ben: Ben Webster zegt het commentaar: ‘Een levende legende, maar een levend lichaam’. De film is gericht op dat enorme lichaam, hoe het zich verplaatst, op de energie die nodig is voor die verplaatsing. Je hebt hetzelfde type montage in het bootje in Vier muren, als die vrouw een aantal keren achter elkaar van het ene vertrek in het andere kruipt. Weerstand en dwang. En dat heeft voor mij te maken met het thema van de informatie, ik weet niet hoe ik het moet zeggen. Maar om een concreet voorbeeld te geven: blinden moeten tien keer meer moeite doen om hun informatie bij elkaar te krijgen dan zienden. Als je het zo bekijkt, dan verandert de fysieke inspanning, het lichamelijk werk, het bewegen en verplaatsen van het lichaam, de slijtage van het lichaam in het thema van de moed. Ja, ik zie daarin een heroïsch thema.”

Johan van der Keuken1

  • 1. Serge Daney, Jean-Paul Fargier, “Een interview met Johan van der Keuken in de Cahiers du Cinéma,” (1978), Sabzian (2013).
FILM
Rangierer
,
,
22’

“Experienced shunters working at the Dresden-Friedrichstadt goods yard. In all weathers, day and night, they couple and uncouple the wagons. The air is full of sound: hammering, steps crunching on the gravel, whistles and shunting noises.”1

  • 1. Jürgen Böttcher, synopsis.
FILM
Train of Thought
,
,
7’

Jim Jennings: Really, all I’m doing is framing. It’s what I’m doing all the time – framing this, framing that, framing. It’s what Ernie was teaching. It’s all about composition. This feels balanced. I like this composition; I don’t like that composition. Why? There’s no reason. It just feels good. In photography, which I do a lot of, you can have a nice composition, but in film, you can put compositions next to other compositions. It is a whole other art form. I’m also interested in what is being filmed, but composition is what’s most important to what I’m doing.

Kathy GeritzThe title of one of your films, Train of Thought, reminds us of your penchant for shooting from different means of transport: a bus (Wall Street), a train, a tram (Prague Winter), the metro (Public Domain), a car (Silk Ties). Could you explain that? Do you want thus to duplicate the energy of the city, the passages, the transitions? We like to talk about your films according to the category of “trains of thought”. For us that is the pace of your films. But it also might be something like “thoughts in a train”.

For practical reasons, a van is a great way to film people in New York because you are moving, but slowly, and there are generally lots of people around. You can get very close to them. Otherwise, I carry the camera in a bag and I pull it out. It’s always really stressful to pull the camera out and then start shooting. I was shooting around Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s very tough. People get angry with you. You get all sorts of reactions. You’ve got to deal with it. If you want to do it, you’ve got to do it. I carry the bag with the camera in the bag, then I take it out of the bag and then I put it back in the bag. The great thing about where I’m shooting in Jackson Heights is that the roar of the traffic and subways overhead covers the sound of the camera. People don’t hear the camera going so then I’m able to get close to people. [...]

Street life changed in the time I’ve been shooting New York but my approach to shooting it hasn’t changed as much as technology has changed. In a way, the pace of my films might be affected by the medium I work in: Films (rather than video). Because film costs something and requires a bit of effort, maybe it’s a more thoughtful or reflective medium than video. With video, you just shoot and shoot, and tape over what you don’t like. Film is precious, so it’s harder to be frivolous with it. You only press the button for what you really want so you usually don’t wind up with a lot of dead shots or go on and on with a single scene too long. Maybe the relative slowness of the process gives the images vitality. That would be ironic. It’s more labor-intensive and more costly, so you don’t linger on a lackluster image.

I’m very distressed about the fact that 16mm is being overshadowed by video. It’s no longer a money problem for me; I can make a film for four or five hundred dollars. Maybe a film costs more now, but I can afford to shoot film. I’ve set up my life so that I can do that because I have a job that pays enough so I can make films. It would never be for money reasons that I would switch to video. I don’t work with sound so my style of making a film is not very sophisticated and it is really cheap.

Kathy Geritz in conversation with Jim Jennings1

FILM
Right, Left, Right, Left
,
,
6’

Fake left.
Run right.
Pass.
There are no messages here. 
So we may breathe. 
Run. 
Dribble. 
Jump. 
We are carefully playing the game 
The body has always wanted a life of its own 
Most days, you’ll find me here.

Mieriën Coppens

FILM
Several Friends
,
,
21’

“Charles Burnett’s first 16mm student film, Several Friends, showcases his early facility with a documentary approach to fiction, his ability to draw out eccentric and endearing characterizations from an ensemble of nonprofessional actors, and his sensitivity to the expressive possibilities of everyday, working class props and locations.”

Doug Cummings1

FILM
All My Life
,
,
3’

“One shot, early summer in Mendocino. Song, All my life by Ella Fitzgerald with Teddy Wilson and his orchestra.”1

 

Bjorn Gabriels: In relation to filming sunlight, you have mentioned Bruce Baillie as an important inspiration.

Apichatpong Weerasethakul: Yes, I was lucky to see his films in 16 mm. This was such a religious experience, almost, because the way he controls the lights and colors is so organic. Later, I found out that he sometimes developed his films himself or that he sent specific instructions to the lab, and that’s so admirable. Especially now that everything is automatic. I would call watching his films ‘religious’ because they are so profound and it’s like watching the wonder of nature.

Bjorn Gabriels in conversation with Apichatpong Weerasethakul2