screening
FILM
Psycho
,
,
105’

“We all go a little mad sometimes.”

Norman Bates1

 

“It was an unkown, a true experiment, and it would be truly something that I’d never seen done before. It was valuable to me just to see what it was. … I’m just trying to give Hollywood what it wants. I’m trying to make something that will actually set them on a path where there will never be and end to their own insanity. I wanted to be able to see Hollywood just sort of eat itself alive by remaking all this past material over and over again endlessly, until it finally just dissapeared. In a way, it was a marketing experiment, to see if it would make money.”

Gus Van Sant2

  

“Curious, how similar the new version is, and how different. If you have seen Hitchcock’s film, you already know the characters, the dialogue, the camera angles, the surprises. All that is missing is the tension – the conviction that something urgent is happening on the screen at this very moment. The movie is an invaluable experiment in the theory of cinema, because it demonstrates that a shot-by-shot remake is pointless; genius apparently resides between or beneath the shots, or in chemistry that cannot be timed or counted.”

Roger Ebert3

 

“The idea that you can take Hitchcock’s Psycho and create another version of it seemed like a legitimate stance in the postmodern cultural landscape that Van Sant inhabits, and a normal part of the art worls, which he knows well. It only seems weird because it is in the form of a $25 million film and was financed by a major studio. If the original were not such a well-known artifact of mainstream culture, Van Sant’s project would no doubt have been received differently. The subversive aspects of Van Sant’s art project went unnoticed by most people. Subversion is perhaps easier to understand when it comes from the outside rather than from within [...].”

Mario Falsetto4

  • 1. Played by Anthony Perkins in Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960) and Vince Vaughn in Psycho (Gus Van Sant, 1998).
  • 2. Mario Falsetto, Conversations with Gus Van Sant, (New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015).
  • 3. Roger Ebert, “Psycho”, 1998.
  • 4. Mario Falsetto, Conversations with Gus Van Sant, (New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015).
Tue 26 Mar 2019, 20:30
KASKcinema, Ghent
PART OF
FILM
Psycho
,
,
105’

“We all go a little mad sometimes.”

Norman Bates1

 

“It was an unkown, a true experiment, and it would be truly something that I’d never seen done before. It was valuable to me just to see what it was. … I’m just trying to give Hollywood what it wants. I’m trying to make something that will actually set them on a path where there will never be and end to their own insanity. I wanted to be able to see Hollywood just sort of eat itself alive by remaking all this past material over and over again endlessly, until it finally just dissapeared. In a way, it was a marketing experiment, to see if it would make money.”

Gus Van Sant2

  

“Curious, how similar the new version is, and how different. If you have seen Hitchcock’s film, you already know the characters, the dialogue, the camera angles, the surprises. All that is missing is the tension – the conviction that something urgent is happening on the screen at this very moment. The movie is an invaluable experiment in the theory of cinema, because it demonstrates that a shot-by-shot remake is pointless; genius apparently resides between or beneath the shots, or in chemistry that cannot be timed or counted.”

Roger Ebert3

 

“The idea that you can take Hitchcock’s Psycho and create another version of it seemed like a legitimate stance in the postmodern cultural landscape that Van Sant inhabits, and a normal part of the art worls, which he knows well. It only seems weird because it is in the form of a $25 million film and was financed by a major studio. If the original were not such a well-known artifact of mainstream culture, Van Sant’s project would no doubt have been received differently. The subversive aspects of Van Sant’s art project went unnoticed by most people. Subversion is perhaps easier to understand when it comes from the outside rather than from within [...].”

Mario Falsetto4

  • 1. Played by Anthony Perkins in Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960) and Vince Vaughn in Psycho (Gus Van Sant, 1998).
  • 2. Mario Falsetto, Conversations with Gus Van Sant, (New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015).
  • 3. Roger Ebert, “Psycho”, 1998.
  • 4. Mario Falsetto, Conversations with Gus Van Sant, (New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015).